Posts Tagged ‘disabled children’

Inclusive School Health and Nutrition Programmes

Wednesday, April 15th, 2015

According to the World Health Organisation, approximately 93 million children in the world – 1 in 20 children aged 14 or younger – have a moderate or severe disability. The majority of them live in low- and middle-income countries, are not enrolled in school and have very poor access to the most basic health and nutrition opportunities. Whether it is due to poor data or a lack of knowledge and understanding, school health and nutrition (SHN) policy makers and programmers have previously struggled to visualize this group and respond effectively to their needs. These children have been left behind.

(more…)

Inclusion and Me

Wednesday, April 30th, 2014

From a young age I knew that I wanted to be in mainstream education. I didn’t like the concept of being away from home and not being with my family. That was the biggest thing I didn’t like when I was little. (more…)

Exclusion with Inclusion? How can we tell the difference?

Wednesday, September 4th, 2013

If you are reading this, my guess is that you believe in inclusive education for all children and young people, however how do we know when inclusion becomes exclusion? To achieve inclusion in an inclusive setting, is educating a child outside of the classroom necessary? When and if it happens what stops it from turning into another form of exclusion? (more…)

Illegal Exclusions from School

Wednesday, March 6th, 2013

A recent report looking at the illegal exclusion of disabled pupils paints a bleak picture. But campaigners say that it could be the tip of the iceberg.

More than 50 per cent of the families with a disabled child who participated in Contact a Family’s Falling Through The Net report said that they had been asked to collect their child before the end of the school day because of a lack of support staff.

The report also found that more than 50 per cent of families had been told that a school activity or trip was unsuitable for their disabled child.

Unlike formal exclusions, schools do not have to report these sorts of exclusions to the local authority. It is not subject to review or external monitoring and can drag on indefinitely.

The report put the weekly level of illegal exclusions at almost 25 per cent and the daily figure at 15 per cent.

Read full article, including what ALLFIE had to say here: http://disabilitynow.org.uk/article/illegal-exclusions-school-bad-report

Inclusion in Afghanistan

Wednesday, December 12th, 2012

You’re going WHERE?’ was the anxious response from most people when I told them that I had accepted a job in Afghanistan, where I would spend a month evaluating an inclusion project for the Swedish Committee for Afghanistan (SCA). (more…)