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Allfie's Blog

Happy Birthday Dalai Lama

July 22nd, 2015

Is it just me or did anybody else sense Alan Yentob’s surprise when he asked the Dalai Lama, at the Edinburgh Festival, ‘Does music make you happy?’

I’m sure Alan, and many in the audience, did not expect the response, “not much”. After the initial laughter from the crowd, the Dalai Lama’s (DL) more detailed response provided the scenario of countries such as Iraq or Syria, where humans are killing each other and whether music being played would reduce their anger and violence towards each other. The DL’s response being “I don’t think”. Read the rest of this entry »

Inclusive School Health and Nutrition Programmes

April 15th, 2015

According to the World Health Organisation, approximately 93 million children in the world – 1 in 20 children aged 14 or younger – have a moderate or severe disability. The majority of them live in low- and middle-income countries, are not enrolled in school and have very poor access to the most basic health and nutrition opportunities. Whether it is due to poor data or a lack of knowledge and understanding, school health and nutrition (SHN) policy makers and programmers have previously struggled to visualize this group and respond effectively to their needs. These children have been left behind.

Read the rest of this entry »

Film Poems by Heathar Barrett

March 11th, 2015

Sitting in the Darkness – A Film Poem by Heathar Barrett:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ql3fTKCjdZk&feature=youtu.be

 

Delemere Forest – A Film Poem by Heathar Barrett:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fdGWNhTLHB0&feature=youtu.be

How Blind Victorians Campaigned for Inclusive Education

October 22nd, 2014

Disabled people’s voices are often missing from mainstream history, but texts reveal that a group of blind activists fought for inclusive education during the Victorian times:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-ouch-29327232

 

Inclusion and Me

April 30th, 2014

From a young age I knew that I wanted to be in mainstream education. I didn’t like the concept of being away from home and not being with my family. That was the biggest thing I didn’t like when I was little. Read the rest of this entry »

Blackburn College – Further Education and Inclusion

October 2nd, 2013

At a recent discussion day organised by ALLFIE, a talk by Ann Harwood centred on the educational provision at Blackburn College. This is a college which OfSTED describes as ‘outstanding’.

Ann is the ‘Additional Learning Support Manager’ at Blackburn College and during her presentation, she discussed, from her perspective, how the college worked towards creating an inclusive educational provision. Read the rest of this entry »

Exclusion with Inclusion? How can we tell the difference?

September 4th, 2013

If you are reading this, my guess is that you believe in inclusive education for all children and young people, however how do we know when inclusion becomes exclusion? To achieve inclusion in an inclusive setting, is educating a child outside of the classroom necessary? When and if it happens what stops it from turning into another form of exclusion? Read the rest of this entry »

Illegal Exclusions from School

March 6th, 2013

A recent report looking at the illegal exclusion of disabled pupils paints a bleak picture. But campaigners say that it could be the tip of the iceberg.

More than 50 per cent of the families with a disabled child who participated in Contact a Family’s Falling Through The Net report said that they had been asked to collect their child before the end of the school day because of a lack of support staff.

The report also found that more than 50 per cent of families had been told that a school activity or trip was unsuitable for their disabled child.

Unlike formal exclusions, schools do not have to report these sorts of exclusions to the local authority. It is not subject to review or external monitoring and can drag on indefinitely.

The report put the weekly level of illegal exclusions at almost 25 per cent and the daily figure at 15 per cent.

Read full article, including what ALLFIE had to say here: http://disabilitynow.org.uk/article/illegal-exclusions-school-bad-report

Call to Action – Open Letter

February 27th, 2013

An Open Letter from
The Alliance for Inclusive Education, (Allfie) to all who are concerned, about the ending of a commitment to Inclusive Education In Newham

 20th February 2013

Disability News Service (DNS) has raised the concern that Newham College is about to embark on a project, supported by Newham Council, that will result  in the segregation of hundreds of  disabled students. The national and international reputation of The London Borough of Newham, where inclusive education was assured, is in danger of being totally undermined by The Management of Newham College. Read the rest of this entry »

Inclusion in Afghanistan

December 12th, 2012

You’re going WHERE?’ was the anxious response from most people when I told them that I had accepted a job in Afghanistan, where I would spend a month evaluating an inclusion project for the Swedish Committee for Afghanistan (SCA). Read the rest of this entry »